Jeffrey Marshall, the president of Heritage Conservancy in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss the organization’s mission and work conserving and preserving a combination of natural and cultural heritage resources in Southeastern Pennsylvania. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • Jeffrey’s background combining his lifelong loves of nature, history, and architecture with his graduate studies
  • Heritage Conservancy’s function as a non-profit organization in the Southeastern PA region, focused on dual aspects of community and cultural heritage: conservation of open spaces and natural resources and preservation of historic buildings
  • Educational outreach by Heritage Conservancy, including Jeffrey’s “Sherlock Homes” old house detective character, aiding homeowners in “investigations” of their old homes’ histories via consultation or research
  • The conservancy’s work assisting owners of old homes and buildings with applying for National Register status and obtaining conservation land easements or historic preservation easements
  • Challenges and trends in these fields, including decreased interest in conservation and preservation of local cultural heritage and greater numbers of new residents without local roots, resulting in an increased need to teach more community members why local cultural heritage is important to everyone

 

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Follow their News & Events webpage or follow them on Facebook to find out about events and new projects!

The conservancy and Jeffrey believe that we are all custodians and caretakers of our collective and local cultural heritage, and it’s important for individuals to do what they can – even if you’re not in the Southeastern PA region, contact them for suggestions on taking action in your own community.

Lindsey Bennett of KIZ Resources, LLC, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss the company’s tax credit transfer services. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • Origins of the company – originally named for the Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit (KIZ) – and their focus on state and federal tax credit transfers for businesses
  • Their specialized services assisting businesses located in historic buildings to enroll in and benefit from the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program, as well as federal preservation tax credits
  • Qualifications for the preservation tax credit programs, including that the applicants must have income-producing buildings, the building must be on the National Register of Historic Places, any renovations must follow the Secretary of the Interior’s standards for historic rehabilitation, as well as some other stipulations
  • Other services provided, including assisting clients with selling tax credits, the Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit, and Neighborhood Assistance Program, among others
  • Challenges with uncertainty of state budgets, particularly given COVID-19, and Lindsey’s recommendation to business-owning constituents in Pennsylvania to reach out to legislators and encourage them to continue to support funding for tax credits

 

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Follow them on Facebook (or contact them) to find out about seminars available to learn more!

 

Steve Larson, principal at Adelphi Paper Hangings, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss his work recreating historic block print wallpaper. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • Steve’s background growing up with access to his father’s paint and wallpaper store, and his art school projects using wallpaper
  • How a project on block print wallpaper at the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY eventually led to the founding of Adelphi Paper Hangings in 1999
  • The history of wallpaper in America
  • Adelphi Paper Hangings’ products, all of which are block print style and primarily from the “Golden Age” of block-printing (1740-1840)
  • The block printing process they use, including materials and procedures closely aligned with those of the past
  • Recommendations on how to purchase wallpaper, including measuring amounts needed, and the pricing process for commissioned pieces
  • Notable projects and commissions, including ones at the DAR museum, Mt. Vernon, and Sir John Soane’s Museum in London, England

 

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If you’re unsure of the benefits of historic reproduction block-print wall paper, Steve indicates that with Adelphi’s block print process, the final resulting wall paper has a richer surface appearance that can’t be replicated with screen or digital printing, and is best for reproducing a historic pattern. 

For information about products and services visit here, and for information about ordering, go here.

You may also contact them about free samples the size of business envelopes, or larger $15 samples. 

 

Jymm Hoffman, blacksmith and owner of Hoffman’s Forge, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss his work as a blacksmith and historical consultant. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • His background, including how reenacting sparked his interest in preservation
  • How he maintains historical-accuracy wherever possible, and his research-findings including the diverse skills and jobs of historical blacksmiths
  • The consultation process with clients and the diversity of projects
  • Projects of note, including creating kitchen equipment for the Renfrew Museum
  • What he wishes he knew when he started, as well as challenges in preservation related to blacksmithing

 

Contact/Follow:

Website

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Email –[email protected] (preferred contact method)

Phone –724-251-9320

For information about products and services visit here, and for information about consultation, go here.

Read more about Jymm’s work, here and here.

Ahmed Zidan of Hollander Glass joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss the company’s restoration/historic branch, Hollander Historic. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • The company’s background and the history of glass-making
  • The company’s services, primarily as specialty glass fabricators and distributors
  • Hollander’s historic line of restoration window glass, including glass appropriate to periods over the last 300 years
  • Notable projects using Hollander’s historic line, including skylights at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. 
  • Challenges for window restoration projects, including more stringent energy codes

 

Contact/Follow:

Main Website and Restoration Website

General contact information or contact Ahmed directly at [email protected] or by calling him at 732-346-1211

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Promotion/Deal:

Ahmed said if you contact him via phone or email and mention this podcast, you will receive a sample restoration window pack including samples of their most popular restoration products!

During the June 2019 Practical Preservation Event the librarian from LancasterHistory shared all of the resources they have to help historic home owners to research the history of the homes, both the architectural history and the history of the people. One of the resources was the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. You can find out a lot of information from these maps including building construction, chimney construction, window and door openings with shutter notations, plus firefighting equipment and the water and electricity system in the city or town. Sanborn Maps can document changes to a building over many decades.

Millersville, PA 1912 Sanborn Map

The Sanborn Maps were used for underwriting insurance. The surveyors were concerned with the building construction to assess fire risk. Most larger cities after the Great Chicago Fire in 1871 stopped permitting frame construction to reduce the risk of fire spreading. Daniel Alfred Sanborn begin serving for Aetna in 1867 and by the next year he was surveying across the county for various fire insurance companies.

The Sanborn company surveyed over 12,000 U.S. cities and towns until 1977. The Library of Congress has over 25,000 sheets from over 3,000 city sets online in the following states: AK, AL, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, GA, ID, IL, IN, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NV, OH, OK, PA, SD, TX, VA, VT, WY, and Canada, Mexico, Cuba sugar warehouses, and U.S. whiskey warehouses. You can research online here: https://www.loc.gov/collections/sanborn-maps/

If you are interested in learning more about researching your home’s history you can listen to an episode of the Practical Preservation podcast featuring Kevin Shue from LancasterHistory: https://practicalpreservationservices.com/practical-preservation-podcast-featuring-kevin-shue-of-lancaster-history/

 

Bob Yapp – noted preservationist, teacher, and consultant – joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss his extensive work and experiences in the field of preservation. We covered multiple topics, including:

  • Bob’s background in preservation, from being a school-aged child whose father taught him what it means to be the steward of an old home, to buying and preserving his first home as a high school student, and eventually earning a syndicated television role on PBS in the 1990s
  • His continued focus on hands-on preservation and restoration coupled with consultation, teaching, and project management 
  • His mission to save traditional artisan trades via national workshops and his Belvedere School for Hands-On Preservation
  • The ways in which preservation is economically – “preservation doesn’t cost-it pays” – and environmentally beneficial 
  • Although preservation is very unique and made of a diverse workforce, the field needs to do more to bring in people of color, and to be more accessible to the average owner of old homes

 

Contact/Follow:

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Email – [email protected]

Phone – 217-474-6052

Bob believes that apprenticeships and trade skills are essential – you can visit his website for more information about his Belevedere School for Hands-On Preservation and national workshops here and here.

If you’re interested in consultation with Bob, you can visit his website and click the “consult” tab.

Robert Blackson, Director of Temple Contemporary Tyler School of Art and Architecture at Temple University in Philadelphia, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss the Vital Signs Project. We covered many things, including:

  • Robert’s background as a curator and belief that “culture is something that civilizes us.”
  • The history of sign-painting for advertisement purposes, including a color-coded system
  • How painted advertisements become “ghost murals,” and how they come to represent the unique history of a neighborhood
  • How the Vital Signs Project came into being and led to a collaboration between Temple Contemporary and the Temple Mural Arts Program, professional artists, and art students
  • Vital Signs Project’s commitment and dedication to the idea that art can transform society, by providing historic preservation and restoration gratis to give the Philadelphia area’s small businesses a reinstated sense of belonging and a boost the surrounding communities
  • Successful completed projects in the Philadelphia area, which have increased business and local morale
  • Challenges involved, including work to bring together the right projects and artists, as well as potential projects lost to increasing gentrification in Philadelphia

 

Contact/Follow:

Website

Email – [email protected]

Phone – 215-777-9139

Robert shared that interested people can support the Vital Signs Project by nominating small Philadelphia-area businesses in possession of ghost signs, in keeping with the project’s purpose to reinstate businesses in their communities and in turn boost the surrounding community and neighborhood.  If interested in proposing a nomination, email or call Robert at the email or number above.

You can also read more about the ghost mural project that started it all, here, and about another project, here

Further reading on sign preservation by the National Park Service can be found here

 

Julie Fitzpatrick and Mary Tate, Executive Director and Field Services Coordinator of Pennsylvania Downtown Center, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss the nonprofit organization’s mission and services. We covered a multitude of topics including:

  • Julie and Mary’s backgrounds in related fields 
  • How the mainstreet methodology remains relevant, particularly when addressing current issues and “creating places where people are choosing,” as Julie says
  • How they address issues like the pandemic and civil unrest/protests, including helping communities develop task-forces and encouraging community dialogue
  • Ways individuals can support their local communities/downtowns, especially during these unusual times
  • How preservation is an economic advantage for communities, and how to leverage its benefits
  • Trends and challenges in preservation in downtowns and communities, including the possibility that preservation will be at risk based on shifting priorities
  • Their continued effort to adapt to circumstances, while upholding the core importance of mainstreets and downtowns as the unique symbol of their communities 

 

Contact/Follow:

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Contact information – general inquiry or specific staff

Julie and Mary suggest some ways that interested people can support their communities via PA Downtown Center, including utilizing their free resources, or becoming a member

Also, stay tuned for an upcoming educational resource – they will be collaborating with Donovan Rypkema of Place Economics related to the economic benefits of preservation.

Patricia O’Donnell and Gregory De Vries, founder and managing partner of Heritage Landscapes, joined the Practical Preservation Podcast to discuss their preservation landscape architecture and planning firm. We covered a multitude of topics including:

  • How their diverse educational backgrounds enabled them to forge their current careers in a niche industry
  • Terminology including “landscaping” vs. “landscape architecture,” and how the latter focuses on a framework for landscape as a place instead of an action
  • Approaches to planning and preservation, including viewing preservation as “respecting what you inherit” rather than invariably returning a space to a specific point in time
  • Notable projects by the firm, including the Elisabet Ney Museum in Austin, TX, a rehabilitation of Jackson Park in Chicago, IL, and an authentic restoration and reconstruction of gardens at Oldfields Estate in Indianapolis, IN 
  • Challenges to working on heavily visited (Little Round Top at Gettysburg, PA) or occupied (Jimmy Carter National Historic Site) landscapes, and managing preservation in these living landscapes
  • Commercial and professional volunteer services, including involvement with world heritage sites
  • Their service area, which includes most of the United States and some international locations

 

Contact/Follow:

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