“The past is not the property of historians; it is a public possession. It belongs to anyone who is aware of it, and it grows by being shared. It sustains the whole society, which always needs the identity that only the past can give.” – William J. Murtagh

You might have guessed by now, but we’re passionate about the preservation of our built history.

Old buildings aren’t just interesting to look at, they serve as the foundation of our culture – time capsules from the past that are just as worthwhile, curious, and interesting as the people who lived, consorted, governed, gathered, and otherwise inhabited those buildings.

Second only to our passion for those grand old buildings that grace our streets is our passion for sharing what we know about preserving the contributions their architecture makes to our sense of place.  As with many things in life, there’s a lot of misinformation out there and wading through the mud and muck can sometimes be overwhelming.

So we do it for you.

It’s our nature to stay informed about all kinds of things preservation related, and we’re more than happy to share.  Our Resource Center is full of educational (and sometimes quirky and entertaining) content to help you learn more about what preservation is (and what it isn’t), how it happens, who’s doing it and where, what techniques artisan craftsman use in the traditional trades, the guidelines for preserving a historic building, how to’s for those who like to tinker, and so much more.

Knowledge is Power, as they so often say.

The dissemination of information is vital to a healthy and thriving culture.  And it’s just as important for healthy and thriving historic buildings.  We believe that the more you know, the more you can do, and as far as we’re concerned there’s no such thing as too many people “doing” historical preservation – the more the better.

Please be sure to stop back often, we’re always adding more information.

Stephen McNair of Mc Nair Historic Preservation joined the Practical Preservation podcast to share with us his experiences and the services his firm provides.  Listen to learn: 

  • Potential issues with historic tax credits
  • Trends in adaptive reuse
  • Economic incentives for commerical use preservation projects
  • The biggest obstacles and challenges for planning historic projects

Contact:

Website

Facebook

 

Happy Halloween!  A little deviation from our usual Practical Preservation podcast episode – Sean Wagner from Mason Dixon Paranormal Society was interviewed to discuss their paranormal investigations.  Sean has been involved in over 200 investigations (and is now trying to find Big Foot with the Central Pennsylvania Investigators). 

If you are wondering what a typical paranormal investigation entails, how to have unexplained occurrences investigated, and where to search for Big Foot in the mid-Atlantic region this podcast is for you.

Contact – if you need an investigation or would like to get involved:

Sean Wagner [email protected]

Facebook 

Charles Flickinger from Flickinger Glassworks joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss his business and career as an artisan.  Our conversation varied from minimalist living to repairing curved glass of the Statute of Liberty flame.  Curved glass is a speciality, niche business and Charles has collected over 4,000 steel molds from different projects (I learned the curved glass starts flat and is curved as it is heated).  Flickinger Glassworks can make curved laminated and insulated glass in addition to the curved architectural pieces and art work.

Charles shared this quote Admiral Bryd during our conversation, ““Half the confusion in the world comes from not knowing how little we need.” and shared that Flickinger Glassworks makes table ware.

Contact: 

Charles Flickinger – [email protected]ickingerglassworks.com

718-875-1531

Offer:

A field trip to the workshop in the Red Hook neighborhood in Brooklyn, NY.  And if you are looking for an artisan workshop – reach out to Charles.

Catherine Brooks from Eco-Strip, the exclusive US distributor of the Speedheater Paint Removal System, joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss her company which allowed her to bring together her passion for the environment and public health.  

The Speedheater is different from other heat-based paint removal systems because it heats the paint using  InfraRed allowing the paint to heat and lift from the wood, but not hot enough to release lead fumes into the air.  Here’s a video of the newest Speedheater – The Cobra:

A longer version of our teaser for SH Cobrawww.speedheater.se

Posted by Speedheater System AB Sverige on Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Contact:

Eco-Strip – call 703-476-6222 or email [email protected] 

Website: https://eco-strip.com/

Offer: $30 off of a Cobra or Speedheater kit with tools using code KPS

 

Joe McCormick, realtor, joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss real estate and historic homes.  

We discussed:

  • Tips for historic home buyers and sellers
  • How to choose a real estate agent for your historic home search or listing
  • Why older properties are good values for real estate taxes
  • Understanding any regulations that may impact your property rights

Contact:

Joe McCormick – 610-637-8598 (text or call) or email: [email protected] serving Chester and Delaware counties in Pennsylvania

After our Practical Preservation event in June at Lancaster History I reached out to our contact to see if they would have someone share their resources for researching house histories on the Practical Preservation Podcast.  Kevin Shue joined the podcast and shared his more than 30 years of experience working with the collection at Lancaster History.

There are many resources to help you find the history of our home.  The two areas of concentration most people are searching for are the year the house was built and/or the history of the people who built and subsequently lived in the house.  

Resource options:

  • Tax records
  • Deed recordings
  • Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County – individual property records from county surveys
  • Census records: population, manufactures schedule to show craftsman and trades, and agricultural schedules to show crops, livestock, and acreage
  • Estate Inventorys
  • Countywide maps
  • Fire Insurance maps
  • Photos

Photos of the Lancaster History Collection:

Bio:

Kevin worked at LancasterHistory for thirty years.  He has helped thousands of researchers over this time period.  He has help authors of numerous books, and given lectures on various topics here in Lancaster;, as well as, Dublin, Ireland, Belfast, Northern Ireland; County Tyrone, Northern Ireland; and Quinnipiac University in Connecticut.

Contact:

Lancaster History – lancasterhistory.org (research) or 717-392-4633

Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:30am-5pm

Matt Barley joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss the work of  Lancaster County Preservation Trust and his preservation philosophy.

Some of the highlights of our discussion were:

Contact:

website: https://hptrust.org/

email: [email protected]

https://www.facebook.com/historicpreservationtrust/

https://www.instagram.com/hptrust/

Bio:

Matt Barley grew up working on the farms of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. When he was 16, he spent three months in Kenya building a library from the foundation to the roof with local resources and hand tools. Having this experience early in life radically influenced his perspective on the world and specifically inspired him to become a designer and maker.
For his undergraduate degree Matt studied Industrial Arts, which allowed him to explore traditional means of construction and antique furniture reproduction. After undergraduate studies, he ran a small construction company making and designing bespoke residential and commercial installations and structures. As the years progressed, he was continually approached by creative customers because of his outside the box design solutions. Seeing customers delight in his creative solutions inspired him to have some formal design training.
Matt Barley was accepted to Rhode Island School of Design’s (RISD) Interior Architecture program. It was during this time that he began to leave the world of antique reproduction and began to design his own structures and furniture.
He currently works full-time as an Interior Designer at RLPS Architects in Lancaster. Matt designs and fabricates furniture and art on nights and weekends. Additionally He is a board member of The Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County.

Dr. Lori joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss her passion for helping people discover the treasures within their families. Jonathan and I meet her at a LNP (the Lancaster Newspaper) antique appraisal (you can watch that video here).  When I reached out to Dr. Lori about an interview on the podcast she was so enthusiastic – I can tell she really loves to educate people about antiques and how to care for them.  

Contact:

Website: https://www.drloriv.com/

You Tube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrLoriV

Bio:

Dr. Lori is the star antiques appraiser on the History channel’s #1 rated TV show The Curse of Oak Island, Discovery channel’s Auction Kings and appears on FOX Business Network’s Strange Inheritance.

Dr. Lori has shared her expertise with Business Insider, NBC TV’s TODAY show, Anderson LIVE, Comedy Central’s The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, NBC TV’s The Tonight Show, Inside Edition, and Lifetime Television. Dr. Lori is an award-winning TV personality and TV talk show host with the Ph.D. in art history.

Ph.D. antiques appraiser, Dr. Lori Verderame is an internationally syndicated columnist and an author with 30 books to her credit. She has contributed a blog to Lifetime Television and has been an editor of several lifestyle magazines. Dr. Lori is the director of www.DrLoriV.com.

Presenting more than 150 events every year, conducting in-home appraisal visits and appraisals online, Dr. Lori reviews approximately 20,000 items a year.

Offer:

Events

 

Andy deGruchy joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss his Craftwork Training Center, the historic masonry contracting and supply business and his philosophy of the body, mind, and spirit working together to create art.  His 35 years of experience as a mason was highlighted as he explained his dive into the material science world and now working to help train the future craftsperson.  

Contact:

Limeworks or Craftwork Training Center: 215-536-1776 Or email Andy at [email protected]

Bio:

Andy deGruchy is a brick and stone mason and historic masonry restoration contractor for 35 years based in Quakertown, Pennsylvania.  Andy does all his work using specialty mortars and plasters that he has imported from France for the last 20 years.  In 1999 he started LimeWorks.us, a specialty supply company that ships custom formulated replacement mortars for historic masonry structures throughout the United States.  LimeWorks.us and deGruchy Masonry Restoration employs approximately 21 people.  Andy also, operates a Craftwork Training Center, based in Telford, Pennsylvania, that teaches participants how to use LimeWorks.us mortar, plaster, and stone patching material called Lithomex. Andy is married to Audrey and they have four children.

Offer: 

Veterans Discounts (call for details) and 50% off Craftwork Training Center courses for Buck’s County Community College students plus 1.5 prior learning units toward program requirements (offer extended to all other students)

 

 

 

William Woys Weaver joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss his research into food history and how it lead him back to his grandparents garden and forgotten heirloom seeds.  This episode combines my love of food and history.  The intersection of the two tells our collective stories and reflects the values of the time period (it is interesting to me that during the time we began eating lots of processed, easy foods that our building methods also changed to a more assembly line mentality).  

Contact:

Website  email or call with any heirloom seed questions you might have.  

Event: The National Heirloom Seed Expo – with book signing and lectures

Bio:

Described as the “Merlin of American regional cookery,” William Woys Weaver is an internationally known food historian and the author of 17 books. He is a rare four-time winner of the prestigious IACP/Julia Child Cookbook Awards, his most recent gold medal going to Culinary Ephemera, a beautifully illustrated survey of old food advertising materials. His 1993 award winning cookbook Pennsylvania Dutch Country Cooking has been included in the anthology: 100 Great American Cookbooks of the 20th Century. Weaver’s Dutch Treats: Heirloom Recipes from Farmhouse Kitchens was published by St. Lynn’s Press of Pittsburgh in September 2016 and a new edition of his classic Heirloom Vegetable Gardening has been published by the Quarto Press with new photos and expanded text. In May he received the 2019 Award of Excellence from the American Council on Botanical and Horticultural Libraries. Dr. Weaver received his PhD in food ethnography from University College, Dublin (Ireland) – the first degree of its kind to be awarded by that university — and is now Curator Emeritus of the Roughwood Seed Collection of heirloom food plants at the historic Lamb Tavern in Devon, Pennsylvania. Called “the Waldon Pond of heirloom seeds,” the Roughwood Seed Collection provides rare limited edition seeds online at www.TheRoughwoodTable.org and through the Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company at www.Rareseeds.com Dr. Weaver is presently working on a two-volume study of the medieval foods of Cyprus. His book on pickling with heirloom vegetables called The Roughwood Book of Pickling will be published by Rizzoli this coming September 24th. It is now available for preorders online at Amazon.com.

For further information:
www.WilliamWoysWeaver.com
www.FaceBook.com/ William Woys Weaver: Epicure with Hoe