Stephen McNair of Mc Nair Historic Preservation joined the Practical Preservation podcast to share with us his experiences and the services his firm provides.  Listen to learn: 

  • Potential issues with historic tax credits
  • Trends in adaptive reuse
  • Economic incentives for commerical use preservation projects
  • The biggest obstacles and challenges for planning historic projects

Contact:

Website

Facebook

 

Gina Douty joined the Practical Preservation podcast to share with us her over 30 years of historic preservation experience.  Having worked in both the public and private sectors she brings a variety of experiences and knowledge to the discussion (we had a great conversation after we finished the recording about her early experiences as a young, female architect – I wished I had kept the recorder going).

Gina Douty offers historic preservation consulting in Central Pennsylvania (and beyond) her services include:

  • Federal and State Historical Rehabilitation Tax Credit applications and submissions
  • PA Historic Resource Survey Form preparation and submissions
  • National Register Nominations
  • Rehabilitation Proposals
  • Section 106 Reviews as an Architectural Historian (36 CFR Part 61)
  • Grant Writing
  • Historic Building Research, Documentation, Assessment, and General Design Guidance

Contact:

Gina M Douty, Historic Preservation Consulting, LLC 717-512-1032 or email: [email protected]

Conference: PA Statewide Conference on Heritage – No Norm Dorm Case Study 

Bio:

Gina M. Douty is a historic preservation consultant who lives and works in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.  Her undergraduate degree is from Penn State University in Architecture with a Special Studies in Historic Preservation.  She began pursuing a Masters in American Studies at Penn State Harrisburg, while working full-time as a Historic Preservation Specialist, then later, an Architectural Designer II with the PA Historical and Museum Commission in Harrisburg.  Gina became a mom, and she took some quality time off from my career to raise her family.  Eventually, she began to work part-time at the office and part-time at a home office, with an architectural firm in Harrisburg.  For over ten years, she was the firm’s preservationist, then later, an Associate.  In 2012, with nearly 25 years in the Historic Preservation field, she created Gina M. Douty, Historic Preservation Consulting, LCC, a certified woman-owned, small business, to assist those who desire, need, or have a passion for historic preservation consulting services.  Gina later completed her Masters degree in Historic Preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design, and was fortunate to receive the Graduate Achievement award as Preservationist of the Year for her graduating class.

 

John Walters from LeWalt Consulting Groupe joined me to discuss how tax strategies can help with land and property preservation efforts.

We covered:

John’s contact information and additional resources:

LeWalt Consulting Groupe, LLC
https://www.facebook.com/LeWaltConsulting

727-388-9024

Tax Codes Referenced:
Conservation Easements
Historic Preservation Tax Incentives
Energy Incentives

Bio:
John is an Enrolled Agent, Certified Tax Coach, Best Selling Author, Instructor and Speaker at the firm LeWalt Consulting Groupe, LLC located in St. Petersburg, Florida.
He is known on LinkedIn as:
“Florida’s Leading Pro-Active Tax and Financial Change Agent for your Diverse needs and Individual Lifestyle”
At LeWalt Consulting Groupe, LLC our PASSION is creating “Tax Alpha” that helps you, as the Entrepreneur and Business Owner, live the “Ultimate”​ TAX-FREE lifestyle you desire using the complexities written into the Internal Revenue Service Tax-Code to your favor!
After all… We believe those numbers on your TAX FORMS is your “REAL” money, why not protect, preserve, and keep it for you and your family?
How may we Help You Live a Life that is less taxing…?

Tran

Announcer: Thank you for tuning into the Practical Preservation podcast. Please take a moment to visit our website practicalpreservationservices.com for additional information and tips to help you restore your historical home. If you’ve not yet done so, please subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, and Sound Cloud, and also like us on Facebook.

Announcer: Welcome to the Practical Preservation podcast hosted by Danielle Keperling. Keperling Preservation Services is a family-owned business based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania dedicated to the preservation of our built architectural history for today’s use as well as future generations. Our weekly podcast provides you with expert advice specific to the unique needs of renovating a historic home, educating by sharing our from-the-trenches preservation knowledge and our guests’ expertise, balancing modern needs while maintaining the historical significance, character, and beauty of your period home.

Danielle: Thank you for joining us on the Practical Preservation podcast. Today, we have John Walters speaking with us about some tax tools that you can use to help preserve buildings. John is an Enrolled Agent, Certified Tax Coach, best-selling author, instructor, and speaker at the firm LeWalt Consulting Groupe, LLC. located in St. Petersburg, Florida. He is known on LinkedIn as Florida’s leading proactive state and financial change agent for your diverse needs and individual lifestyle.

Danielle: “At LeWalt Consulting Groupe, LLC., our passion is creating tax alpha that helps you as the entrepreneur and business owner live the ultimate tax-free lifestyle you desire using the complexities written into the Internal Revenue Service tax code to your favor. After all, we believe those numbers on your tax form is your real money. Why not protect, preserve and keep it for you and your family? How may we help you live a life that is less taxing?”

Danielle: So John, thank you for joining us and sharing your knowledge about the tax code and how that can be used to help us preserve buildings.

John: Well, thank you Danielle. I enjoy talking to people about taxes even though, I’m sure for most, it seems like a boring subject, but it’s one of the most things you’re going to pay all of your life and you might as be able to control it to your best ability.

Danielle: And understand it the best you can. I know I don’t feel I understand everything as much as I probably should. But yeah, I think the protections that people don’t understand that are written into tax code are really interesting because they can help you finance a project, they can help you make sure the building is preserved. Those things, I don’t think people necessarily think that those are tax code things, but they are. So thank you for sharing that knowledge with us.

John: Sure, no problem.

Danielle: I know one of the things that most people don’t either understand or are aware of is the tax conservation easement. If you could talk to us a little bit about that and help us understand. I understand a little bit from a preservation standpoint that the easement means that the outside can’t be changed because it’s protected, but I don’t understand what the tax ramifications of that is.

John: Okay. In the Internal Revenue Code, there’s a section called 170(h) and it talks about land conservation strategies, especially for federal and state taxes. What a land conservation strategy is designed to do is it’s designed to meet basically the tax payer’s – in this case, your client or whoever you’re working for – financial goals and take into heart their charitable desires.

John: In essence, it’s to preserve their properties and realize their most favorable economic outcomes, and actually, you get some tax savings out of it too. You become part of what we call the ready to conserve your assets for individuals and enjoy the related tax savings possible and the income opportunity in the property’s amenities.

John: In essence, what you want to do is let’s say you have a piece of property, but you don’t want it to be built on or you want to preserve it for generations to come and things like that. There are provisions in the tax code under the land conservation easement strategies is to actually give that land away. In essence, you’re giving it away for the purposes of being able to develop it or use it for some other commercial purpose to the government and you have official documents that tell you that you can do that. In turn, there are charitable deductions that you can take for that conservation.

John: With that, your land is preserved. Basically, you still retain rights to it, but you just can’t use it for other purposes, intended purposes.

Danielle: So it almost restricts you? Yeah, it restricts what you do with it. Okay.

John: Exactly. You have basically a deed of restriction, but that land can be used for whatever thing that you set it up for.

John: For instance, let’s say that you have land and you want to preserve it for hunting and you don’t want anybody to build anything on it. You could have a land conservation easement for that property; it could still be used for hunting and you can use for that purpose. You can even build a structure on there like a lodge or something like that and people could use it for hunting, but they wouldn’t be able to use for some other commercial development.

Danielle: [crosstalk 00:06:17] Yeah.

John: Yeah. In turn, when you take that conservation easement, the government’s giving you a tax deduction and it can be up to 50% of your adjusted gross income. Let’s say for every dollar this property is valued at, you go get it appraised and stuff, sometimes you can get to four to five times the benefit. In essence, what you’re telling is, well, if I built it commercially, this is what it would be valued at. But if I-

Danielle: So if you develop the property, that’s why they use as your [crosstalk 00:07:00]

John: Right.

Danielle: Okay, that makes sense.

John: So if I was going to put a housing development on it, it would be worth X. But if I say, “I don’t want to allow that on there,” they’re going to take that value of the housing development, it’s appraised out, subtract what the land is worth right now, and you get the difference in the tax credits.

Danielle: Okay. Okay, and then is that an actual credit onto … I’m trying to think about what I’m familiar with preservation easements. You usually then donate that to a nonprofit, is that correct? Or is the conservation a little bit different?

John: Yeah, it’s actually donated to the government, per se, because it’s under tax code. Now, there’s the charitable contributions fall under the federal tax code, but you can also get state tax credits too, depending on what state you’re in and the property.

Danielle: Yeah, I know. Yeah, the preservation tax credits are very dependent on which state you’re in, how robust they are.

John: Mm-hmm (affirmative), exactly.

Danielle: Yeah. So this benefits the person that’s doing the easement by reducing their taxable income. Is that pretty much what the goal is?

John: Right. You can reduce your actual tax that you would owe by between 30 and 50% of your adjusted gross income.

Danielle: Okay.

John: Now, let’s say it exceeds 50% of your gross income in that particular year, those charitable credits can be carried over for many years into the future until you can use them up.

Danielle: Okay.

John: Yeah, so typically, if you don’t have a whole lot of income in that particular year, it will just carry over until you can use those up.

Danielle: Use it up, so there’s not a time limit. I was thinking there’s a difference – and now this is telling you what I don’t understand about taxes. There’s a difference between a credit and a deduction, is that correct? So the credit is like just straight money to you, it’s not based on any kind of scale, correct? Is that what-

John: Well, yeah. There are credits that are basically a one-to-one dollar reduction in your taxes. Now, in the credit world-

Danielle: Okay, so [crosstalk 00:09:27] a percentage. Yeah.

John: Exactly. In the credit world though, you have two types of credits. You have what we call non-refundable, meaning that it can reduce your income, your taxes to zero. Then after that, if you still have more credit, you can’t use it anymore. You won’t get additional money back. But if they’re refundable, that means that you could have zero income tax that you owe, and still get a refund back from the government. Now-

Danielle: Oh, okay. Makes sense. Yeah.

John: And with the deductions, they are a percentage, depending on what your marginal tax bracket is. So in essence, a deduction, if you’re in the 25% tax bracket, then you’re going to get 25% or 25 cents back on the dollar for every dollar you deduct.

Danielle: Okay, okay. I know I see, in this area, a lot of conservation easements for farmland.

John: Exactly.

Danielle: Where the families want to preserve their farms from development but they still want to be able to use them and farm them. The easement doesn’t stop you from being able to use it from how you’ve been using it; it’s how you write the easement. Is that correct?

John: Right. So for an example like that, in farming and ranching, Ted Turner, which we all know from the broadcasting world and everything else, he has huge tracks of land in Wyoming and Montana that he has easements on. He still allows – there’s wild buffalo that run on there. He has cattle that graze and everything so it can still be used for ranching, but no one can actually develop it into a housing development or any commercial purpose.

Danielle: Okay, okay. Very, very interesting. Thank you. So then when you go to do the charitable deduction, then they figure out what the amount would be if they developed and then they give you … Is it the difference? Is that pretty much what your credit is?

John: Yeah. So for instance, let’s say it would be valued, appraised, at a million dollars if it was fully developed, but right now in your hands, ownership, it was worth really only $100,000, per se, in undeveloped land and everything else. So in fact, you could probably get a deduction for the $900,000 difference there.

Danielle: Because you’re not using it to develop it completely. It is a benefit then to the community too. That does make sense to me as to why it would be a tax credit also because you’re agreeing to leave it the way it was. It’s not [crosstalk 00:12:20].

John: Right, yeah.

Danielle: Yeah. So what are the risks to somebody who wants to use an easement or a land conservation easement to preserve their property? What would the risks be to that?

John: Well, a couple risks, not necessarily to the owner of the land. There are people that actually don’t own the land but want to invest in the ownership of that property with the original owner to get these tax credits.

Danielle: Oh, right.

John: So some of the risk there would be basically you may not get the asset protection as a limited partner instead of the ownership of it. Operating reserves set aside at a closing. There may be monies that are needed in excess of that property for the conveyance of it and the deed. Could be additional capital calls if other risks – or not risks but unknowns are known about the property. Maybe there was so encumbrances on the property that you didn’t know about and stuff, so money would have to become available to take those encumbrances away so that deed could be unrestricted.

John: Sometimes there’s a taxation risk basically due to audits because sometimes these things are not put together correctly. Lately, there’s been a little bit of talks in the IRS about making this what they call a listed transactions, where they still allow it, but you would have to list it there of what the transaction was and basically have your, per se, ducks in a row if you wanted to-

Danielle: [crosstalk 00:14:19] yeah.

John: Yeah. Of course, as always, anything in the code is subject to abuse.

Danielle: Right.

John: You may be working with unscrupulous people, a.k.a. crooks, that want to take your money basically and don’t do it properly so the whole deal falls apart.

Danielle: Yeah. That and I know that when we talk to home owners about it, people are nervous about restricting their deeds. I don’t know if you have that knowledge if it … Does it lower the value of the property or is it usually somebody who would be interested in conservation, is that something that would be appealing to them?

John: Oh, it would be very appealing to someone because most of us do have a charitable gift to us or want to do something, either that, preserve it for nature or actually for our legacy and stuff like that. But even if you end up selling the property or whatever, that easement and everything else can convey to the next group of people in ownership.

Danielle: Yeah, it attaches to the deed. Yep. Then they then have to … As far as I know, that is the only preservation tool that actually restricts what you can do because even being on the National Register, that building can still be torn down if you take the appropriate steps and get approval. You know what I mean?

John: Right.

Danielle: So that doesn’t protect it as much as the easement does. I know of a project here in Lancaster that they were going to develop. It was where Thaddeus Stevens had his offices in Lancaster. They were going to tear it down and then the nonprofit that held the easement came forward and said, “No, you can’t. We have an easement on this property.” And they actually ended up, it’s really a cool building to look at now because they incorporated the modern construction around this building. It’s marrying that old with the new, but they had to keep the original building there because they did hold the easement.

Danielle: That’s the only preservation tool that I know guarantees that the building will not change and have to stay the way it has been. So very, very [crosstalk 00:16:51].

John: Yeah, exactly because you are actually accepting a deed of restriction that permanently prohibits some sort of commercial exploitation and rights to the real estate property and stuff. You’re absolutely right. That’s pretty much the most ironclad vehicle there to be able to preserve something.

Danielle: Right, okay. And then I know you had given me some notes. I have that you would talk about the energy efficient property credits.

John: Sure, sure.

Danielle: Those are being extended, which is kind of exciting for people who are wanting to maybe put some green energy to use in their homes.

John: Yeah. The wind and solar credits have actually been extended to 2024 because our government sees the value of doing that and making us less reliant, basically, on fuels like oil and gas and things like that. The interesting thing is for these types of credits, you can qualify up to 30% of the eligible cost, which in fact, I just did one for a client this tax season.

John: They invested in a solar roof. They spent $52,000 on the roof. They ended up getting a $17,000 tax credit back, so it kind of wiped out all of their tax that they owed. Yeah and they’ll actually get to carry some over into the subsequent years because they used up all the taxes that they had this particular year.

John: So yeah, the beauty about theirs is … They were so excited because they started getting checks from the power company. In fact-

Danielle: Oh, that is exciting.

John: Yeah! They got a $400 check back from Duke Energy, which is the provider in the area. They were so elated because now the power company owes them money.

Danielle: Yeah. I know that when we started talking, you and I had started talking about doing this podcast topic, we had just been talking about the Tesla roof material. Those are individual solar cells. They picked all things that would be traditional materials and you can’t tell the difference. I’ll be curious to see how those are embraced, once they do their full roll-out, by the preservation community because those solar panels, the types of [crosstalk 00:19:42] they chose-

John: Oh, the new shingles?

Danielle: Yeah, but they chose slate and tile, those are not inexpensive roofing materials anyway. So if somebody’s going to do that, I’ll be curious to see how it’s embraced by the preservation community because there’s definitely that intersection of green and then traditional-looking materials at least.

John: Right.

Danielle: I think that’s pretty exciting.

John: Yeah. A lot of those things are coming out from the world of the Tesla vehicles and all of that to Elon Musk and producing new types of materials.

John: Yeah, that was the thing is people, they liked the idea of the solar, but they didn’t want to have these what they would consider ugly panels on their roof. So now-

Danielle: [crosstalk 00:20:29], yeah, yeah.

John: Yeah. It’s probably going to be in your world, open up a lot more opportunity and people to want to do that because yeah, now they can more look like the original property that we’re trying to preserve and everything, and get the efficiency out of it of modern energy systems.

Danielle: Yeah, definitely. I think that’s something exciting to definitely keep an eye on.

Danielle: The other thing and something that I think that people know about but it’s kind of like they don’t know a lot about it is the rehabilitation credits. I know the federal government has theirs, and then the State of Pennsylvania has some. There’s not a lot of money in the state. The tax credits here are very new for rehabilitation. I think they’re only a couple of years-old. I know that the federal tax credits have been around for a while and they’ve actually shown good economic development benefits, but if you could talk a little bit about the Rehabilitation Credits in the tax code.

John: Yeah, there’s rehabilitation credits.

Danielle: That’s a tough word.

John: Yeah, I know. That’s under Internal Revenue Code Section 47. There are actually two of them. One, it’s a 10% of the qualified rehabilitation expenditures, or whatever you spend, with respect to the qualified rehabilitated building. Other than a certified – it doesn’t have to be a certified historic structure in this case, okay?

Danielle: Right.

John: You can still get 10% of that. Now, in the second case, you can get 20% of the qualified rehabilitation expenditure, or cost, if it is a certified historic structure. So there, you can benefit even more.

John: Basically, the federal government is telling us, “Look, we understand you want to keep these buildings. They’re great buildings or whatever like that. They just need some tender love and care. We’re going to help you lower the cost to go ahead and rehab these buildings, especially if you’re going to keep them in order, use them for an economic purpose.”

John: So what we’re kind of looking at too is, okay, what’s in it for the government? Well, obviously if you’re going to be able to use that building, rehab it, for its use or just bring it back up to code so you can keep using it, well, they’re going to get more tax money, right?

Danielle: Right, right.

John: Because you’re going to remain in business and use that building. Well, the states, obviously, are still going to benefit because they’re going to get additional property taxes and they’ll probably reassess it on the rehabbed cost of it because, oh, it’s gone up in value because you rehabilitated it. There’s two benefits there.

John: Now, obviously the states benefits aren’t as rich as the federal government because, as we know, our government’s got plenty of money to throw around. Right?

Danielle: Right. Maryland has a really good rehabilitation credit system though. Theirs is, I think if you combined the federal and Maryland’s, you can get up to 50%.

John: Yeah.

Danielle: Yeah, so some of the states have a really good system.

John: I think it’s great. And so basically, it’s something to take into benefit there if you have a building that would meet those criteria. There again, you might get a little bit if it’s not a historic building, but still, it might be in your benefit to do it.

John: Now, like everything that we do in the tax code, there’s good and bad things. Well, the good thing is, yes, you could get some assistance there for doing it. The bad thing is you might have to jump over some hurdles, some paperwork, this and that, and everything else. But I found that once you do it, it’s well worth it.

Danielle: Yeah, I agree. It is a process to get through that because at first, you have to be approved by the State Historic Preservation Office, and then you go. They actually, once they have everything that they need, then they forward it onto the National Park Service for review. But typically, it is a lot of paperwork, but most people can get through it. It’s just having to stay on top of it.

Danielle: I do know one thing that is, and the tax benefits, one thing that’s kind of frustrating to homeowners that this is mostly or it is just for income-producing properties. So you’ve either gotta be a business or a bed and breakfast or rental unit, something like that.

John: Right.

Danielle: One other thing that I learned that’s very interesting is the tax credits on your passive income. Well, most people don’t have a lot of passive income. So I sat through a presentation. I’m like, “Oh, that makes so much sense.” Banks are willing to pay, buy the tax credits from you, because they have passive income and they can use them. The credits are transferrable. I didn’t know that.

John: Yeah, yeah.

Danielle: When I heard that, I was like, “Oh my goodness. I never would have thought to shop my tax credits to anybody,” but there are people who do it.

John: That’s an interesting point that you bring up. You know, a lot of people say, “Well, if I can’t use them, I lose them.” No, they actually have benefit and people are willing to use them. The other thing too is you’ve heard of those called carbon tax credits for pollution and everything else?

Danielle: Yeah, yeah.

John: Well, let’s say you have a business and you get X amount of tax credits, but your business is pretty efficient, non-polluting, and everything else. You get these credits but you don’t use them all the way or whatever like that. Well, there’s certain other businesses that are more polluting and they need more credits than they actually get from whatever they’re producing, so they’ll buy those credits from you and that helps them out too. There is a market for that.

Danielle: Yes, I would have never even thought that until I was sitting in that presentation. I’m like, “That makes so much sense.” Because most people, even if they’re high-income people, don’t have a lot of passive income, but banks do. I thought that was a really, really interesting thing that I learned.

John: Yeah. And the thing most people don’t understand is you have to match up the types of income and losses to be able to take them. For what you’re just saying there, if you have passive income, you have to have passive losses to match up against them. You can’t take income that you earned from your job and actually offset passive income or investment income in there. That’s a key.

John: What we try to do there is if we do have a client that does have lots of passive losses, we try to find some passive incomes. We call it a PIG PAL strategy. Passive activity losses matched up with passive income generations.

Danielle: Oh, okay. Very cool. Yeah, you understand how to maximize these strategies. I thank you for sharing your knowledge with me and our listeners. Could you tell me, unless, did you have anything else you wanted to share or anything that we didn’t care that you wanted to?

John: Well, I think that’s pretty good.

Danielle: Oh, okay. Very good.

John: There’s so much embedded in there.

Danielle: There is.

John: Yeah.

Danielle: And I’ll definitely, the tax codes or sections that you referenced, on the website resource section, I will definitely put those there so people can go and read them.

John: Okay.

Danielle: And your information will definitely be on the website too, but how can our audience get a hold of you if they have specific questions or they want to use your expertise to help preserve their buildings?

John: Well, they can actually call my office if they want. My phone number directly is 727-388-9024. If, by chance, somebody doesn’t answer the phone, leave a message and we get back to you in a short amount of time.

John: You can also go to my website it’s www.lewaltconsultinggroup.com and leave a message there or we have lots of information on the website that you can contact us or find out some other information about the different tax codes. I think you’ll probably put our website on your-

Danielle: I will, yeah, I’ll definitely make sure that gets put on the website too. We’ll have links, and I’ll have the additional information, and anything else that we think that would be good resources for all of our listeners.

Danielle: Thank you so much for joining us today.

John: Okay, well, yeah. It was a pleasure talking here and one last thing.

Danielle: Oh, sure.

John: With the broadness of the tax code, people think, “Oh, it’s just in general,” or whatever. There’s really something for everybody in there, we just have to sometimes dig deep for you. If you employ certain people, there’s tax credits for employing certain groups of people.

Danielle: Right, yeah. We had just learned that we could get a Made in America tax credit because we manufacture. I never even thought about what we do as manufacturing, but it is! There’s always something in there that you might not even think would apply to you.

John: Yeah, so every situation, individual situation, is different. Don’t think that there’s nothing in there for you. There may be, depending on what you want to do. Hey, it’s worth a phone call or a short email conversation. We can see what we can do for you.

Danielle: Okay, very good. Thank you so much again.

Announcer: Thanks for listening to the Practical Preservation podcast. The resources discussed during this episode are on our website at practicalpreservationservices.com/podcast.

Announcer: If you received value from this episode and know someone else that would get value from it as well, please share it with them. Join us next week for another episode of the Practical Preservation podcast.

Announcer: For more information on restoring your historic home, visit us at practicalpreservationservices.com

 

 

Preservation Pennsylvania has released their “Pennsylvania At-Risk: Twenty-Year Retrospective of Pennsylvania’s Endangered Historic Properties, Where Are They Now” edition. It’s a fascinating look at preservation in action and we’ll be posting a look at each property in a series of posts over the next several months.

INTRODUCTION
Preservation Pennsylvania established the annual Pennsylvania At Risk list in 1992, making us the first statewide preservation organization in the United States to have an annual roster of endangered historic properties. Since 1992, we have listed and worked to
preserve more than 200 endangered historic resources, including individual buildings, historic districts and thematic resources statewide. For 2012, as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of our organization, we are presenting a 20-year retrospective edition of Pennsylvania At Risk. In this issue, we revisit some of the amazing historic places across the Commonwealth, some of which have been rescued from extinction through preservation and rehabilitation efforts, and others that still need our help.

Approximately 18% of Pennsylvania’s At Risk properties have been lost, having been demolished or substantially altered. Another 32% have been saved or are in a condition or situation where the identified threat no longer poses a problem for the historic property. Approximately 50% of the 201 At Risk resources remain in danger, or we have not been able to confirm their current status as either saved or lost.

By monitoring these properties over the past 20 years and working with individuals and organizations trying to preserve them, we have learned many valuable lessons. Those lessons are called out throughout this publication.

 

1997 – Coal Oil Johnny House, Venango County

Coal Oil Johnny

 

• SAVED!•

Commonly known as “Coal Oil Johnny,” John Washington Steele was the Pennsylvania oil boom’s prodigal prince.  Adopted at a young age by the McClintock family, John resided in this circa 1850 wood-frame farmhouse for much of his life.  In return for decades of helping the widow McClintock run the farm and manage oil leases on the property, John inherited the estate when Mrs. McClintock died in 1864.  His inheritance included well royalties of $2,000 to $3,000 per day, plus a huge reserve that the widow had stored in a safe in the farmhouse.

Almost overnight, John stopped working hard and started playing hard.  He left his wife of two years and young son in western Pennsylvania and adopted a flamboyant, expensive lifestyle that included extended stays in New York and Philadelphia, where he rode in a bright red carriage decorated with pictures of oil wells gushing dollar signs.  According to local lore, Johnny once spent $100,000 in a day; he bought a hotel for  a night; he lit cigars with hundred-dollar bills; and diamonds dripped from his fingers.  His life was reflective of the boom and bust of the industry.  After living the high life and drinking heavily in cities along the eastern seaboard while poorly managing his money, Coal Oil Johnny quickly depleted his fortune.  He returned to this farmhouse and his wife and son in 1866, and filed for bankruptcy in 1867.  Johnny returned to work.  After hauling other people’s oil to market and dabbling in business, he moved his family farther west, dying nearly penniless in 1921.

After sitting vacant for more than 50 years and subjected to water infiltration as well as insect and rodent infestation, the structural integrity of the building’s foundation was in jeopardy. Its support beams had rotted, and the building’s exterior cladding was damaged beyond repair.  Unable to find a new owner for the house, the owners announced plans to demolish the building in 1996.  By 1997, when the house was listed in Pennsylvania at Risk, the Oil Heritage Region, Inc. (now Oil Region Alliance) had stepped forward to coordinate emergency stabilization measures.  Making good use of both public funds and private donations, they succeeded in moving the house across Oil Creek to the Rynd Farm in Oil Creek State Park in 2001, where they were able to rehabilitate the house over the following years.  The Coal Oil Johnny House is open for special events, an annual open house, and by appointment.  The immediate threat of demolition has been overcome, and the building is currently safe from harm.  But the Oil Region Alliance could still use additional financial support for expanded programming at the house.

To support this project, please contribute to the Oil region Alliance via their website: www.oilregion.org.

 

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Lessons Learned:

Intervention tools such as grants and tax credits are helping to make preservation projects possible.

The Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission’s Keystone Historic Preservation grants make a significant impact on the ability of municipalities and non-profits to preserve endangered historic buildings for public use. At least 48 grants have been given to 25 of Pennsylvania’s 201 At Risk properties as a result of the Keystone Recreation, Park & Conservation Fund. The federal Save America’s Treasures program assisted at least six additional projects that were once at risk of being lost. At least nine additional endangered historic properties in Pennsylvania have benefited from grants from the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP). The NTHP has invested additional funds into initiatives started to address the threats identified in Pennsylvania at Risk, such as the demolition of historic properties for construction of new, large houses and stores, and addressing problems common among specific property types, such as churches and schools.

At least 20 historic properties that were included in Pennsylvania At Risk over the past 20 years have benefited from the federal Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit. All relatively large commercial rehabilitation projects, these projects are scattered all around the state, occurring in Allegheny, Bedford, Blair, Crawford, Dauphin, Erie, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, and Philadelphia Counties. With the new state tax credit in place, rehabilitation tax credits will certainly continue to provide important financial incentives for preserving Pennsylvania endangered historic properties in years to come. [/sws_grey_box]

 

The Central Pennsylvania Preservation Society recently hosted representatives from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission for a presentation on the brand new state historic tax credit program.  You can read their summary of the presentation here.

 

 

 

The Coalition for Smart Growth will present a no-cost forum called “New Uses for Old Buildings – Making It Work for You” on Thursday, October 25th, from 6:30-9:00pm, where expert panelists will discuss their experiences reusing existing buildings.

Click here to read more or register: http://www.coalitionforsmartgrowth.org/forum-new-uses.html

 

Tax Incentives for Preserving Historic Properties

The Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives program encourages private sector investment in the rehabilitation and re-use of historic buildings. It creates jobs and is one of the nation’s most successful and cost-effective community revitalization programs. It has leveraged over $62 billion in private investment to preserve 38,000 historic properties since 1976. The National Park Service and the Internal Revenue Service administer the program in partnership with State Historic Preservation Offices.

Group of people on a tour of Baltimore tax incentives projects.

20% Tax Credit

A 20% income tax credit is available for the rehabilitation of historic, income-producing buildings that are determined by the Secretary of the Interior, through the National Park Service, to be “certified historic structures.” The State Historic Preservation Offices and the National Park Service review the rehabilitation work to ensure that it complies with the Secretary’s Standards for Rehabilitation. The Internal Revenue Service defines qualified rehabilitation expenses on which the credit may be taken. Owner-occupied residential properties do not qualify for the federal rehabilitation tax credit. Learn more about this credit before you apply.

Each year, Technical Preservation Services approves approximately 1000 projects, leveraging nearly $4 billion annually in private investment in the rehabilitation of historic buildings across the country.

10% Tax Credit

The 10% tax credit is available for the rehabilitation of non-historic buildings placed in service before 1936. The building must be rehabilitated for non-residential use. In order to qualify for the tax credit, the rehabilitation must meet three criteria: at least 50% of the existing external walls must remain in place as external walls, at least 75% of the existing external walls must remain in place as either external or internal walls, and at least 75% of the internal structural framework must remain in place. There is no formal review process for rehabilitations of non-historic buildings. Learn more about this credit in Historic Preservation Tax Incentives.

Tax Benefits for Historic Preservation Easements

A historic preservation easement is a voluntary legal agreement, typically in the form of a deed, that permanently protects an historic property. Through the easement, a property owner places restrictions on the development of or changes to the historic property, then transfers these restrictions to a preservation or conservation organization. A historic property owner who donates an easement may be eligible for tax benefits, such as a Federal income tax deduction. Easement rules are complex, so property owners interested in the potential tax benefits of an easement donation should consult with their accountant or tax attorney. Learn more about easements in Easements to Protect Historic Properties: A Useful Historic Preservation Tool with Potential Tax Benefits.

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Tell us your thoughts…

Have you been involved in a project that used the federal rehabilitation tax credit?

What questions do you have about the federal income tax credit for historic properties?

What do you want to know more about this tax incentive? [/sws_grey_box]

Tuesday afternoon I sat in on a webinar focused on what traditional products teach us about durability and sustainability (essentially green building). I am going to pass some the information from the webinar along during this post – next week I will be back to sharing information from the Traditional Building Conference.

*In order to evaluate if a product is durable and therefore sustainable there needs to be a life-cycle assessment (LCA).
*Desirable green attributes:
-Durability
-Low Maintenance (but repairable)
-Fire Retardant
-Life cycle benefits – extending the service life
*2009 new LEED rating systems
-Point increases for urban living (density and alternative transportation)
-Life Cycle Assessment – focuses on structure/envelope assemblies
-Preservation of existing buildings adds points – traditional materials are preferable because of environmental impact
-Leed for Existing Buildings looks at accreditation without major renovations through changes in Operations and Maintenance

Traditional Materials are Sustainable:
-Masonry Walls both brick and stone
-Traditional Lime based mortar
-Roofing – slate, metal, clay tiles
-Old growth woods
-Anything that has stood the test of time and with care and attention can last another 100 plus years is a green solution

On Sunday, October 19, Chuck, Lois, Jonathan, Danielle, and Josh attended the Architectural History Tour of the Northeast Lancaster Township Historic District. The tour was appropriately called “Mansions on Marietta” and highlighted buildings built as the first suburban development in Lancaster County.

The oldest house on the tour was built in 1828 and is Wheatland home of 15th President James Buchanan. The other six homes on the tour (private residences) where built between 1920 and 1939. These houses reminded us of the “old” (at least 100 years old) building on the West Coast.

Historic Preservation Incentive Program (HB 221) is a piece of pending legislation that will help preserve historic structures across Pennsylvania. The legislation is designed to encourage people buying, selling, or dealing with historic buildings to be sensitive to the buildings history. This legislation will give more incentives to homeowners and developers making more grants and tax credits available for the preservation/rehab of historic structures. This legislation would help the state in multiple ways: preserving our collective built history, encourage economic development, and reinvest capital in our cities and towns. Twenty-nine other states have already enacted similar legislation.

What can you do?
The budget negotiations are going on right now and are scheduled to conclude next Tuesday, July 1st. Contact Governor Rendell, your State Senators, and House Members. Let them know how important our historical resources are to you. For more information regarding HB 221 contact the National Trust for Historic Preservation at http://www.nationaltrust.org/ (information is available on the advocacy page of their website along with a letter to e-mail to your local representatives and Governor Rendell).