David Trowbridge from the Clio app joined the Practical Preservation podcast to discuss his Wikipedia-like local history depository.  The Clio app began as a classroom project and has grown to over 32,000 historical entries with 5,000 daily users!  Users can add local history sites, walking tours, source documents, and an augmented reality time capsule entry overlaying historical photos of lost or altered buildings.

Get involved:

Donate to the 501c3

Become a local contributor  

Contact David Trowbridge [email protected]

 

 

Never ones to do things in a ho-hum way, we’re throwing a Preservation Circus for our client appreciation day on Friday, August 22nd from 4pm to 7pm.

postcard-4inx6in-h-front

Whether you are a client, thinking about becoming a client, are just curious about what it’s like to be a Historic Restorations client, are into historic preservation, or just want to come for the free fun – come out and enjoy:

 

  • Meeting Penelope the Preservation Puppy
  • Live Bluegrass Music (one of America’s historical music forms)
  • Free food and drinks
  • Colonial themed activities for the kids
  • Touring our shop and office
  • Asking your old house questions

 

Bring a non-perishable food item for a chance to win door prizes! We’ll be collecting non-perishable food items for to help the Council of Churches restock their dwindling food bank supplies. The Council of Churches works together to provide three “no obligation” meals a day at locations throughout Lancaster City and this is the time of year they struggle to keep their pantries stocked with the amount of food they need to do so. Their important work literally feeds hundreds of people each day, with no strings attached, and we are happy to support their efforts.

Please RSVP by calling Moira at 717.291.4688 or visit www.historic-restorations.com/circus.

 

astleyDid you know?

The father of the modern circus was Philip Astley.  In the mid-1700’s he performed “feats of horsemanship” in a circular arena he called a “ring”.  Not only did the circular shape help the audience to see him at all times, it also generated the centrifugal force Astley needed to keep his balance while standing on the back of his galloping horses.

In 1770 he decided he needed more novelty in his performances and added acrobats, rope-dancers, jugglers, and a clown.  And so the modern circus was born.

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Blog

The Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office (PHPO) has launched a new blog “PA Historic Preservation” where  you can keep up with all the preservation happenings in Pennsylvania.

From their blog:

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“The Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office (PHPO) is part of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC). The Commission is the Commonwealth’s official history agency, and the Executive Director is designated as the State Historic Preservation Officer. Oversight of the Commission is provided by a board of Commissioners appointed by the Governor.

The role of the PHPO is to identify and protect the architectural and archaeological resources of Pennsylvania. Our responsibility is to work with individuals, communities, local governments, and state and federal agencies to educate Pennsylvanians about our heritage and its value, to build better communities through preservation tools and strategies, to provide strong leadership, both individually and through partnerships, and to ensure the preservation of Pennsylvania’s heritage.”

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The Pennsylvania Preservation Post

The PHMC also has an email newsletter, the “Pennsylvania Preservation Post”, you can subscribe to for information on preservation in Pennsylvania.  You can sign up on the PHPO blog (look on the sidebar at the right of any page to find the signup form) or visit: http://phmc.us5.list-manage.com/subscribe/post

 

 

 

Rhonda Sincavage (Associate Director for Intergovernmental Affairs at the National Trust for Historic Preservation) talks about what historic preservationists do, and what they look like (we’re not the little old, blue-haired women most people think of, she points out).  And most importantly, how historic preservation encourages economic growth, incubates independent and small business growth, promotes green building practices and sustainable construction, and builds a sense of community.

httpv://youtu.be/zwSPIRceSi0

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday we exhibited at the Historic Home Show at York. As part of the Historic Home section of the Mid-Atlantic Garden Show at the York Expo Center. We enjoyed connecting with people that are interested in maintaining and restoring their vintage properties. The availability of regional “historic” home shows helps building owners find many resources for their projects under one roof. We try to list as many as we can on the events page on our website – any information you can pass on is much appreciated.

On Saturday, September 20, 2008 we presented “How to Approach Work on Your Older Home” to a group of interested homeowners in Columbia, Pennsylvania. We discussed avoiding common mistakes, how to make an older home more energy efficient, and how to plan for the work. After we finished the question and answer segment Chuck offered to take anyone who was interested to go outside to look at some of the mistakes made (previously, such as, sandblasting and using Portland Cement based mortar) on the Columbia Market House and the maintenance tasks that can be completed to help preserve the building. The preservation fair was sponsored by The Borough of Columbia and the Historic Architectural Review Board through the support of The Richard C. von Hess Foundation.
Green building is all the rage in the building industry. I can not open a remodeling or design/build magazine without a reference to a green building project. Preservation and restoration work is green in it’s approach. By using resources (building materials) that have already be harvested on land that has already be cleared is a greener approach than building a brand new building using new green materials. When you are building a new building you have to create the resources, ship them to the building supply store, and then ship them to the job site on the newly cleared land (from farmland, forest, or a tear down).

Storm Cunningham in The Restoration Economy (covering all aspects of the restoration economy natural and built environments) states that 25% of all landfill waste is from construction activities. By reusing the salvaged materials from buildings that are being torn down in our restoration projects we are keeping those materials out of the landfills.

It is easy with these new green materials to refer to new building as green. The new building materials are green for a new building approach but that approach is not necessary the best method when working on an older home (one built before 1945). There are ways to take a green building approach when dealing with your older building that does not include retrofitting inappropriate modern materials.

Historic Preservation Incentive Program (HB 221) is a piece of pending legislation that will help preserve historic structures across Pennsylvania. The legislation is designed to encourage people buying, selling, or dealing with historic buildings to be sensitive to the buildings history. This legislation will give more incentives to homeowners and developers making more grants and tax credits available for the preservation/rehab of historic structures. This legislation would help the state in multiple ways: preserving our collective built history, encourage economic development, and reinvest capital in our cities and towns. Twenty-nine other states have already enacted similar legislation.

What can you do?
The budget negotiations are going on right now and are scheduled to conclude next Tuesday, July 1st. Contact Governor Rendell, your State Senators, and House Members. Let them know how important our historical resources are to you. For more information regarding HB 221 contact the National Trust for Historic Preservation at http://www.nationaltrust.org/ (information is available on the advocacy page of their website along with a letter to e-mail to your local representatives and Governor Rendell).